M&M Plumbing

Family Owned & Operated in Olympia, Washington

safety

  • Did you know that your bathroom is statistically the most dangerous room in your home?

    According to the AARP, bathrooms are the cause of more household injuries than any other room, including the kitchen.  In 2008, nearly 22 million Americans over the age of 15 were injured in the bathroom, and over 235,000 people were treated in emergency rooms for bathroom-related injuries, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.  Not surprisingly, the total number of injuries increase by age, with the majority of injuries occurring with people over the age of 65.  However, proportionate to their age, 15-24 year olds are actually more likely to be injured in the tub or shower.  

  • This Green & Grow hose is an example of garden hose that is drinking water safe. It's available at Lowe's and other retailers for under $20.This Green & Grow hose is an example of garden hose that is drinking water safe. It's available at Lowe's and other retailers for under $20.To drink or not to drink? That is the question...

    Shakespeare parodies aside, this is a question we frequently hear from our customers. It's safe to say that most of us as kids drank from the garden hose. And if you're still able to read this post, it didn't cause any serious, lasting effects. On the other hand, there are many things we are more aware now that products are better tested and we have a better understanding of the potential dangers of chemicals leeching into our food and water supply.

    So what's the answer? Is it safe to drink from a garden hose? Here is some information that might make you think twice before you pucker up at the spigot:

    In a 2012 Time Article, Dominique Browning outlines research showing that many garden hoses contain everything from lead to endocrine disruptors to neurotoxins. She states that since garden hoses are not regulated in the same way as plumbing fixtures, harmful chemicals are frequently found in hoses. This problem is worse in older hoses, partly because of the way they were manufactured, and partially because the plastic, rubber and metal used to construct them degrades over time.

  • Summer vacation home safety tipsSummer is when many of us have the time (and the sunny weather) to take a family vacation. Before you leave town, we suggest you consider the following safety tips to prepare your home for being unattended. Not all these tips are plumbing specific, but certainly would apply in case of a plumbing emergency, like a leak or a burst pipe.

  • Older fixtures, pipes and solder joints may contain lead and contaminate your home water supply.Older fixtures, pipes and solder joints may contain lead and contaminate your home water supply.You've probably heard concerns about lead in your home water. Home water filters always mention that they remove lead from water. You may have even heard that you shouldn't drink water taken from the hot water tap. We thought it would be a good idea to clarify what the risks are, where they come from, and most importantly, if you are at risk of lead in your home water supply.

    Why is lead an issue? Lead is absorbed by the human body and accumulates over time. It can cause neurological impairment, particularly in children and can cause high blood pressure or kidney problems in adults.

    If your home is connected to city water, rest assured that the water coming to your home has safe and acceptable levels of lead. Lead is rarely found in the source water for water systems, and Olympia, Lacey, Tumwater and other local city water is no exception. The water treatment plants in these cities also constantly test their water for impurities and chemicals, including lead.

    Lead is most often introduced into your home's water through corrosion of plumbing materials in your home, such as the solder used to connect pipes, old fixtures and faucets. Newer homes should not have any issues with lead, since federal regulations now prohibit the use of lead-based materials in plumbing systems. However, if your home was built before 1986, there is a possibility your plumbing system contains lead-based materials.

    The only way to know for sure if your home water contains lead is to have your water tested. If you are concerned your home water may contain lead, or just want piece of mind, we will be happy to refer you to a certified lab that can test your water. According to the City of Olympia, these tests typically run between $20-40 -- a small price to pay if you are worried about drinking water safety.

  • Winter weather in the Pacific NorthwestOne of the great benefits of living in the Pacific Northwest is the summer weather.  Being this far north, we have long, sunny days, moderate daytime temperatures, mild nights and rarely have any severe weather.

    But winter is another story.  While our traditional winter weather is mostly grey skies and drizzle, typically at least once a year we have a major rain event with driving winds and flooding.  And every couple of years, when the conditions are just right, we get hit with a real snow storm.

    January of 2012 was one of those times.  We received over 2 feet of heavy snow within 24 hours.  "Snowmageddon," as we nicknamed it locally, caused city-wide power outages and literally trapped people in their homes for days.  Some people in the outskirts of town lost power for over 2 weeks.

    Predictions are that these types of weather events will become more frequent due to climate change and global warming, so it's wise to prepare your home for the long term.

Contact Info.

M&M Plumbing

Serving Olympia, Lacey, Tumwater and Thurston County

Business Hours
M-F 8am - 6pm

Emergency Services Available 24/7

360.491.9422

WA #MMPLUMP899P4
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