M&M Plumbing

Family Owned and Operated in Olympia, Washington

This Green & Grow hose is an example of garden hose that is drinking water safe. It's available at Lowe's and other retailers for under $20.This Green & Grow hose is an example of garden hose that is drinking water safe. It's available at Lowe's and other retailers for under $20.To drink or not to drink? That is the question...

Shakespeare parodies aside, this is a question we frequently hear from our customers. It's safe to say that most of us as kids drank from the garden hose. And if you're still able to read this post, it didn't cause any serious, lasting effects. On the other hand, there are many things we are more aware now that products are better tested and we have a better understanding of the potential dangers of chemicals leeching into our food and water supply.

So what's the answer? Is it safe to drink from a garden hose? Here is some information that might make you think twice before you pucker up at the spigot:

In a 2012 Time Article, Dominique Browning outlines research showing that many garden hoses contain everything from lead to endocrine disruptors to neurotoxins. She states that since garden hoses are not regulated in the same way as plumbing fixtures, harmful chemicals are frequently found in hoses. This problem is worse in older hoses, partly because of the way they were manufactured, and partially because the plastic, rubber and metal used to construct them degrades over time.

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Americans bought over 9.1 billion gallons of bottled water in 2011. While the containers are recyclable, they use valuable oil to produce and require more energy to recycle. And many bottles still end up in the trash, like in this photo. Americans bought over 9.1 billion gallons of bottled water in 2011. While the containers are recyclable, they use valuable oil to produce and require more energy to recycle. And many bottles still end up in the trash, like in this photo. (photo source: flic.kr/p/7efCQE)As you are surely aware, drinking plenty of water is vital to your health. Our bodies are made up of almost 60% water. Without water, the human body will shut down after just 3-4 days.

Thanks to the bottled water industry, we are constantly inundated with a barrage of messages promoting their product as the healthiest, freshest way to obtain this vital liquid. And we are listening. In 2011, Americans bought 9.1 billion gallons of bottled water, or over 29 gallons per person. (source: shor-tn.us/mm-bottledwaternumbers)

But is this really the best solution?

Here are some facts about bottled water that may shock you:

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Say no to Drano!Just Say No... to Drano!

Do you have a sink or tub drain that drains slowly or is completely backed up? You may be tempted to go for that quick fix and buy a chemical drain cleaner, like Drano or Liquid Plumr. After all, they are inexpensive, easy to apply, and it's a lot cheaper than calling a plumber, right?

Well before you pour that potion down your pipe, you may want to consider the potential risks from using these products.

First, they are highly toxic. The main ingredients in chemical drain cleaners are highly corrosive -- usually sulphuric acid and lye. They work by dissolving grease and hair into a liquid so it will flow down your drain. While the consumer versions of these products are not as concentrated as commercial products, they are still extremely dangerous. The ingredients can be fatal if ingested. If the cleaner touches your skin or membranes, it can cause severe burns. And if the drain cleaner is accidentally mixed with another cleaning agent that contains bleach (like the kinds of cleaners many people use in their sinks and tubs), you may inadvertently create chlorine gas, a highly toxic and deadly gas.

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Boiling lemons in the microwave can help remove old food smells. Photo: Yasser Abusen (flic.kr/p/f3v6xw)Boiling lemons in the microwave can help remove old food smells. Photo: Yasser Abusen (flic.kr/p/f3v6xw)We've all had it: a stinky microwave.

You know that smell: the spaghetti you reheated two weeks ago. Or the plate of salmon that now has your microwave smelling like a fish hatchery. But why does this happen, and more importantly, how do you fix it?

Microwave ovens have fans that dissipate heat from the motor and carry away steam from the cooking chamber. In the case of rangetop overhead microwaves, the fans also serve double-duty as the ventilation system for the rangetop. When you cook items in the microwave, the steam created carries the odor through these systems and makes it coat all of these systems. Once the smell is in there, it continues to be blown around by the fans. While most odors get weaker over time, oil-based odors (like fish) can stick around for weeks.

Here's a simple fix suggested by the website The Snug:

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Contact Info.

M&M Plumbing

Serving Olympia, Lacey, Tumwater and Thurston County

Business Hours
M-F 8am - 6pm

Emergency Services Available 24/7

360.491.9422

WA #MMPLUMP899P4
Bonded & Insured

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